With the release of the third and final movie of the new ‘Star Wars’ saga, Daisy is featured in the Holiday issue of Marie Claire. You can read the full interview and watch her answering some more questions in the video below. The photoshoot (love it!) has been added to the gallery in high quality. Enjoy!

GALLERY LINKS
Magazine Scans > 2019 > Marie Claire (Holiday)
Studio Photoshoots > Outtakes & Sessions > 2019 > Session 006

MARIE CLAIRE — When Daisy Ridley says taco with its short a in her Estuary English accent, it sounds more like a planet in the Star Wars galaxy than the filled tortilla. The actress will conclude her run playing Rey, the flinty heroine and suspected Jedi, in the third film of the trilogy, Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker, out in theaters December 20, and she and I are having lunch at Los Angeles vegan restaurant Nic’s on Beverly to discuss the end of the epic sci-fi saga, the trajectory of her still-nascent career, and the push-pull of navigating a private life with a public persona.

The sprightly brunette suggests sharing several plates, including tempura-avocado tacos and eggplant-Bolognese gnochetti. Ridley forsook meat products after watching Simon Amstell’s cautionary mockumentary Carnage, though she calls herself a “chegan” due to the occasional sushi cheat. The Londoner is in town for Disney’s annual behemoth D23 Expo, which gathers all of its stars in Anaheim to address fans and press. There, a newly released clip showing Rey draped in a dark robe and clutching a red lightsaber had fan sites erupting in furious and urgent speculation: Does Rey cross over to the dark side?!

Continue Reading

Yes, they are back! The cast of ‘Star Wars: Episode IX’ now titled The Rise Of Skywalker attended Star Wars Celebration yesterday (April 12) in Chicago. They gave us a first look at the final chapter and what can we say? It’s exciting! We’ve added high quality pictures of Daisy’s first event of 2019 in our gallery, check them out!
And if you weren’t able to watch the panel live, you can (re)watch it below.


Daisy and co-star Elizabeth Debicki were guests on “This Morning” talk show to promote ‘Peter Rabbit’. High quality pictures from her appearance have been added to the gallery and you can watch her interview below. She also confirmed to attend the UK premiere on Sunday!

GALLERY LINKS
Public Appearances > 2018 > Visits “This Morning”

ENTERTAINMENT WEEKLY – William Shakespeare sure loved a doomed heroine. Some of the Bard’s most famous women — Juliet, Desdemona, Lady Macbeth — all met with a grisly fate, but few are as iconic as Hamlet’s Ophelia, who goes mad with heartbreak and drowns herself in a river. While Hamlet’s insanity and demise have been explored countless times since the play’s publication in 1603, much of Ophelia’s story happens off stage. Claire McCarthy’s new film Ophelia, led by Star Wars’ Daisy Ridley, aims to change that — and reimagine the character as a bold, complicated young heroine.

It’s a radical reinvention for a woman who’s most frequently portrayed in art and literature as a docile, waif-like beauty, driven mad by love and passively accepting her watery death.

“That’s often how women have been portrayed in storytelling — as the damsel in the distress,” says Naomi Watts, who plays Hamlet’s mother, Queen Gertrude. “If their mind is powerful, it must be madness. And now there’s this shift that’s taking place, and that’s reflected in this storytelling.”

Based on Lisa Klein’s novel and premiering this month at the Sundance Film Festival, Ophelia follows its lowborn protagonist as she becomes the most trusted lady-in-waiting for Gertrude and strikes up a relationship with her son, Hamlet (George MacKay). Along the way, Ophelia gets caught up in the court’s deadliest betrayals and secrets, all while trying to find her own path. “We wanted her to feel a lot more empowered and a lot more visceral than the original Ophelia, who is really only in a handful of scenes,” McCarthy (The Waiting City) says. In other words, this Ophelia is more concerned with her own destiny than Hamlet’s emo mopiness. Ophelia’s new direction also gives the 400-year-old play new relevance in 2018. “There’s real currency in the fact that Ophelia was the victim, and now she’s been recast as the hero,” Watts says.

Continue Reading