First of all, Happy New Year! We hope that you spent some quality times with your family and friends and of course thank you for your support!

Daisy graces the cover of Grazia China (January). The gallery has been updated with two covers and outtakes from the very first photoshoot of 2018. Check back later for digital scans. Enjoy!

GALLERY LINKS
Magazine Scans > 2018 > Grazia China (January)
Studio Photoshoots > Outtakes & Sessions > 2018 > Session 001

STYLIST – Daisy Ridley is talking about her favourite washing powder.

“It has got to be Fairy Non-Bio, for sensitive skin. A little touch of fabric conditioner,” she tells me, happily. “God, I love washing my clothes.” Not the conversation I imagined as I flew to LA to hang out with the protagonist of the biggest movie franchise in the galaxy ahead of the anticipated arrival of Star Wars: The Last Jedi. But I’m happy to be immersed in it. The conversation sums up the actress: a normal 25-year-old woman thrust into an extraordinary world. A woman who’s a bit jittery from drinking strong coffee, she confesses.

The Last Jedi is steeped in secrecy. All Ridley can do is reassure me that “the question everyone is asking will be answered” (she is referring to the parentage of Rey, her Star Wars character). But what we do know is this: Ridley will be front and centre again.

The Force Awakens (2015) saw Rey, an orphan and scavenger on a desert planet, discover the Force and fight the First Order. The Last Jedi sees the young warrior develop her Jedi powers, with guidance from Luke Skywalker, and continue to seek her place in the world.

Rey was – is – important because she is not defined by the men around her. She is a talented pilot and combatant. She has been granted proper protagonist status; not just a cipher for plot development. Her costume is one she can move in. She is a survivor. There was an outcry – and a hashtag, #wheresrey – last year over the lack of female characters in the just-released Star Wars merchandise, which has since been addressed – but it is a sign that progress can be slow. Coincidentally, it’s the first time Ridley has seen the Rey mug we took to LA for our shoot.

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THE NEW YORK TIMES – While they tell tales of Death Stars and daddy issues, the “Star Wars” movies are also stories about duality: how goodness and evil can coexist — on the same planet or inside the same person — and what happens when they collide on an intergalactic scale.

These themes are revisited once again in “Star Wars: The Last Jedi,” the eighth episode in the science-fiction saga that George Lucas started in 1977. “The Last Jedi,” which opens on Dec. 15, is the first to be written and directed by Rian Johnson (“Brick,” “Looper”). It follows the resounding success of “The Force Awakens,” directed by J. J. Abrams in 2015, about two young heroes, a scavenger named Rey (Daisy Ridley) and a renegade stormtrooper named Finn (John Boyega), caught up in the search for Luke Skywalker (Mark Hamill).

The new film continues where “The Force Awakens” left off, as Rey and Luke are about to meet on the planet Ahch-To, and it promises a further exploration of their relationship to the sullen evildoer Kylo Ren (Adam Driver) and his nefarious master, Snoke (Andy Serkis). It also features the final performance in the series from Carrie Fisher, who played Leia and who died last December.

At a running time of some two and a half hours, “The Last Jedi” continues the adventures of Finn and Poe Dameron (Oscar Isaac) and their adversaries Captain Phasma (Gwendoline Christie) and General Hux (Domhnall Gleeson). Somehow it finds room for the new characters Rose (Kelly Marie Tran) and Vice Admiral Holdo (Laura Dern), and a wide-eyed alien species called porgs.

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GLAMOUR – Daisy Ridley enters the tiny Montreal vegan sushi joint with a singsongy “Bonjour!”—she’s learning French while in town filming an adaptation of the dystopian YA trilogy Chaos Walking. So far she’s mastered key phrases necessary for a meal. A cheerful “excusez-moi” gets a grin from the young waiter leading us to our table.
Despite an affinity for Dior and custom-made Chloé on the red carpet, Ridley, 25, is currently wearing a nondescript black tank top and saggy gray jeans. With her dark hair scraped back into a bun and a wheely suitcase in tow, she looks more like Harried Commuter No. 1 than the brightest star in the Star Wars mega­galaxy. Still, it takes only a moment for that same waiter to place her and begin clumsily futzing with the water glasses.

The parallels between the actress and her Star Wars character are almost comically—cosmically?—accurate. Like Jedi-in-training Rey, Ridley was plucked from obscurity (London, not a junkyard in Jakku) and thrust into a role of great responsibility: reenergizing one of the most beloved film series of all time while holding her own opposite veterans like Carrie Fisher, Harrison Ford, and Mark Hamill, who returns as Luke Skywalker in Star Wars: The Last Jedi.

And much like Rey, Ridley is in the process of figuring out what to do and who to be in a life that changed as quickly as the Millennium Falcon jumps into hyperspace. “Yes,” she agrees with the tidy comparison, “except I don’t have talents”—she pauses to consider her words—“or rather, I’m not Force-sensitive.” Her current list of projects suggests otherwise: She recently starred in Kenneth Branagh’s adaptation of Agatha Christie’s Murder on the Orient Express, and her post-Rey arc includes everything from the lead in the film Ophelia to a voice-over in Will Gluck’s star-studded Peter Rabbit. She may not be fully Jedi-trained, but the girl has serious talent.

Prestige gigs notwithstanding, Ridley also finds herself at the delicate center of a fierce fandom. In Rey, girls and young women finally have a Star Wars heroine in a role previously reserved for men: the one destined to protect the galaxy. Rey is a light-saber-wielding Jedi who saves the day (and John Boyega’s Finn) herself. And Ridley, too, is a new kind of female celebrity, one who stands at the forefront of a multibillion-dollar franchise and feels confident enough to insist to a room full of Disney executives that Rey dolls aren’t just for girls. (More on that later.)

Of course, not all of being Rey—or famous—has come easy. Remember the wheely suitcase? She’s headed home to London for downtime that serves as an antacid to the surging stress of her Hollywood life. “I had problems with my gut last year,” she admits. “I was so stressed, my gut wall literally had holes in it.” But it wasn’t the meetings with executives, the screaming fans, or the endless photo ops that did it. “It was what everybody kept saying to me: ‘Your life is going to change. Are you ready?’” she says. “I was like, ‘How can I be ready? I don’t know what’s coming.’”

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Daisy is ELLE UK’s cover girl for December in a new festive and elegant photoshoot. We’ve added the cover and high quality outtakes in our gallery. And while we wait for the scans to be added as well, you can read an excerpt of her interview below!

ELLE UK – The British actress is returning as Rey in the next instalment of Star Wars. Starring on the cover of ELLE UK, Ridley addresses filming with Harrison Ford and John Boyega, advice from Carrie Fisher, dealing with the pressure of the role, and meeting Barbara Streisand.

On How Harrison Ford Reminds Her Of Her Dad
‘They both have an earring and are f**king awesome.’

On How The Late Carrie Fisher Advised Her To Not Shrink Away From Success, But To Enjoy It
‘And that was wonderful. At work, you’re normal, you’re not the anomaly, unlike in other situations.’

On Finding Filming For The Last Jedi To Be Much More Pressure Than The first Star Wars Movie
‘I didn’t think I was good in the first film, and I was struggling with that.’

On Dealing With The Medical Condition Endometriosis
‘I was in my flat going nuts, and then my skin got really bad in the stress of it all, and I hadn’t been well – I had holes in my gut wall and stuff – and we were trying to figure out what to do with that because I’d felt poorly.’

On How Having Fewer Scenes With Co-Star John Boyega In The Second Star Wars Briefly Stressed Her Out
‘It’s not this big adventure that I’m on with John [unlike the first movie]. I was thinking I did the first one because I didn’t really know what I was getting myself into and I was having loads of fun, and suddenly I’m realising what this actually is, and I can’t f**king do this. I’m highly dramatic – so it’s all ‘oh my God’…finally I was like ‘Oh yeah, this is working.”

On Meeting Barbara Streisand And Featuring In Her 2016 Album ‘Encore’
‘I went to her house and we talked about [psychiatrist and psychoanalyst Carl] Jung because my dad loves Jung, and we were talking about dreams, and I left and got super emotional, not because she’s famous, but because she’s amazing. Part of her reputation comes from being a woman. If it was a man being ‘controlling’ about his career, people would just say he knows what he wants.’

Read the full interview in the December issue of ELLE UK, on sale 14 November.

GALLERY LINKS
Studio Photoshoots > Outtakes & Sessions > 2017 > Session 005

Daisy graces the cover of V Magazine for the Winter issue (on newsstands November 9). She talks with her ‘Star Wars’ co-star Adam Driver about ‘The Last Jedi’ (obviously), ‘Chaos Walking’ and much more. Check below to read the interview and the gallery for high quality outtakes! We’ll add the scans as soon as they become available, stay tuned.

GALLERY LINKS
Studio Photoshoots > Outtakes & Sessions > 2017 > Session 004

V MAGAZINE“I had no sense of what I was getting into. No sense of what was really going to happen,” confesses Daisy Ridley of her first-ever role as Rey in 2015’s Star Wars: The Force Awakens. Currently, Ridley is on location in a remote forest a few hours outside of Montreal for Chaos Walking, a 2019 sci-fi release costarring Tom Holland. But it’s this December’s Star Wars: The Last Jedi, the follow-up to The Force Awakens, that is shining a blinding light-saber-tinged spotlight on Ridley. The Force Awakens was the first movie since 1997’s Titanic to sell more than 100 million tickets in the U.S. It isn’t typical for a young actress’s breakthrough film to have the biggest domestic opening weekend in history, raking in $238 million, but Ridley isn’t all that typical herself. As the face of the nearly $10 billion franchise, Ridley has ushered in a new era of Star Wars. Following Carrie Fisher’s untimely passing last year, Ridley’s character, a fiercely independent heroine, serves as a particularly strong female voice in a galaxy far, far away. However, a far- flung galaxy isn’t Ridley’s only on-screen locale this season. In November, Ridley appears opposite Johnny Depp and an all-star cast in Kenneth Branagh’s Murder on the Orient Express. The suspenseful tale follows 13 passengers, played by the likes of Penélope Cruz, Judi Dench, and Willem Dafoe, stranded on an opulent passenger train with a murderer on the loose. Aside from blockbuster films, Ridley also produced and narrated the documentary The Eagle Huntress, which follows a teenage girl in the mountains of Mongolia as she becomes the first female eagle huntress in the sport’s 2,000-year history. Ahead of The Last Jedi’s release, Ridley catches up with her Star Wars costar (and “bestie”), Adam Driver.

Daisy Ridley Hey Adam, it’s been so long.

Adam Driver Hey Daisy, how are you? When is the last time that I saw you?

DR Well, I don’t know because you don’t come to all the fun things that I go to. [laughs] Last July? It’s been like a year!

AD Oh, yeah, I guess. I’m much taller now.

DR How has your life changed? [laughs]

AD Oh, just in little ways. So, where are you now?

DR I’m in Canada, two hours outside of Montreal in these creepy woods. We feel like we’re going to be killed at any moment in this cabin. We’re shooting a film, Chaos Walking, with Doug Liman, Tom Holland, and Demián Bichir. It’s fucking cool.

AD Did you guys have time to meet each other before? Or did you just kind of jump right in?

DR I had met Tom Holland twice very briefly—for, like, 30 seconds—and I had met Doug Liman once and we spoke a bit, but it was very much feet first, it was super quick.

AD So, is it hard for you to meet people and just kind of go? Or do you prefer it?

DR [laughs] I mean, as we discovered, Adam, we became besties last year, but we had met some years before. It really takes me a while to relax with people. I don’t think I’m very good at meeting people: I feel awfully uncomfortable. So, I find meeting people very stressful. But it gets easier, and I think I’m getting better at being okay with that, you know?

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